A Reduced Rate of Hospital Admissions for heart failure and pulmonary hypertension during Covid-19 infection. Monocentric experience. Pulmonary Hypertension patients and COvid-19 infection

Main Article Content

Walter Serra

Keywords

Pulmonary Hypertension;Covid-19 infection;Covid-19 outcome

Abstract

 In some paper, the researchers have observed a reduction in admissions for Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) and in particular with ST-segment Elevation (STEMI), during the COVID-19 period. The decrease of the interventional procedures for ACS may be due to the fear of increased risk of infection. I would have some comment around this question. ACS events may be caused by coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, but rather results from an unfortunate confluence involving any of several stable underlying CHD vulnerability factors and the occurrence of any environmental events that acutely activate critical physiological processes.   This is also demonstrated in our patients with heart failure and pulmonary hypertension, in which outpatient access has been significantly reduced compared to the same period in 2019  (65%), where mortality in patients with Sars-Covid 19 was 100%, while the incidence of infection was very low (<1%). Conversely, hospitalization and mortality from heart failure are even reduced compared to the same period in 2019. Perhaps self-isolation could be a self-protection mechanism

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