Cognitive Biases Affecting the Maintenance of COVID-19 Pandemic COVID-19 Cognitive biases

Main Article Content

Kawthar Mohamed
Niloufar Yazdanpanah
Amene Saghazadeh
Nima Rezaei

Keywords

COVID-19; decision-making; media bias; management; meta-cognitive bias; statistical bias

Abstract

All the countries and regions have already been infected with novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). This super small guest has paralyzed the economy of the entire world, from the extreme fall of the oil prices to the bankruptcy of the great companies or even the small retail shops. The people's lifestyle is undergoing significant changes, by which it is leaving a negative impact on their psychological and physical health. The atmosphere is filled with dual accusations from each one of the governments and their citizens. Recognizing cognitive biases that have potentially affected decision-making during the COVID-19 pandemic would help in considering some behavioral changes for curbing this global viral infection.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Abstract 1 | PDF Downloads 0

References

1. Hanaei S, Rezaei N. COVID-19: Developing from an Outbreak to A Pandemic. Archives of Medical Research. 2020.
2. Dong Y, Mo X, Hu Y, Qi X, Jiang F, Jiang Z, et al. Epidemiological characteristics of 2143 pediatric patients with 2019 coronavirus disease in China. Pediatrics. 2020.
3. Marques CF. Why Our Leaders Fail to Learn Pandemic Lessons 2020 [Available from: https://www.bloombergquint.com/gadfly/coronavirus-biases-are-playing-role-in-poor-pandemic-leadership.
4. Pohl RF. Cognitive Illusions Intriguing Phenomena in Judgement, Thinking and Memory: Psychology Press; 2016 28th July 2016. 494 pages p.
5. Tisdall S. From Trump to Erdoğan, men who behave badly make the worst leaders in a pandemic The gurdian2020 [Available from: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/apr/26/trump-to-erdogan-men-who-behave-badly-make-worst-leaders-pandemic-covid-19.
6. Lee VJ, Chiew CJ, Khong WX. Interrupting transmission of COVID-19: lessons from containment efforts in Singapore. Journal of Travel Medicine. 2020.
7. Burghardt K, Lerman K. Systematic Biases in Aggregated COVID-19 Growth Rates. arXiv preprint arXiv:200412994. 2020.
8. De Mesnard L. Tracking COVID-19 pandemic: The per-capita approach changes the whole picture2020.
9. Cinelli M, Quattrociocchi W, Galeazzi A, Valensise CM, Brugnoli E, Schmidt AL, et al. The covid-19 social media infodemic. arXiv preprint arXiv:200305004. 2020.
10. Liu Y, Gayle AA, Wilder-Smith A, Rocklöv J. The reproductive number of COVID-19 is higher compared to SARS coronavirus. Journal of Travel Medicine. 2020;27(2).
11. Yang K-C, Torres-Lugo C, Menczer F. Prevalence of Low-Credibility Information on Twitter During the COVID-19 Outbreak. arXiv preprint arXiv:200414484. 2020.
12. Pennycook G, McPhetres J, Zhang Y, Rand D. Fighting COVID-19 misinformation on social media: Experimental evidence for a scalable accuracy nudge intervention. 2020.
13. Das TK, Teng BS. Cognitive biases and strategic decision processes: An integrative perspective. Journal of management studies. 1999;36(6):757-78.
14. Blumenthal-Barby JS, Krieger H. Cognitive biases and heuristics in medical decision making: a critical review using a systematic search strategy. Medical Decision Making. 2015;35(4):539-57.

Most read articles by the same author(s)