Do certain rituals adapt to psychology or does psychology adapt to rites? Post mortem photography: the last “picture of life” in “death”

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Silvia Iorio
Valentina Gazzaniga
Rosagemma Ciliberti
Marta Licata

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Abstract

In death and mourning, why should we think that rites adapt to psychology and not vice-versa? Or believe that psychological workings grow into a rite or ritual? When analysing practices related to rites of passage, death emerges as a rupture – or breakage – of social status. 

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